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Category Archives: Garden

Know more about Pruning Roses

pruning-rosesKnowing when to prune roses is must be a standout amongst the most well-known cultivating pickles ever. To some less experienced planters it may appear to be irrelevant when you choose to make that cut, and in reality, where. Nonetheless, the minute you prune your roses can be the contrast between a solid dependable plant that delivers various buds and blooms, and one that won’t not last the winter.

This chomp measured guide will ideally go some approach to clarifying the significance of rose pruning, dissipating a few myths and help you to better deal with your rose plants.

# Why Do You Need to Prune Roses?

Before we go into when to prune roses and how to prune roses, we should first explain the reasons why it is important to prune roses at all. You might think roses and many plants in general can fend for themselves without much human intervention, and this is true on the whole. However, pruning and other small maintenance tasks can help plants to grow to their optimum and possibly last longer than they would if just left to their own devices.

The act of cutting a rose branch helps the plant to produce a hormone called auxin. This growth hormone is present in the main stem of most plants and pruning sends it to the freshly cut stem and encourages it to produce new shoots.

Pruning roses also helps to control the size and shape of your rose plant while ensuring it’s health and flowering capabilities.

# When to Prune Roses

The majority of roses are pruned between late winter, during February and early March, but this normally depends on your climate and where you are in the UK.

In the south you are safest to prune roses in late February just as the new growth begins on rose plants. If you live in the north and other colder areas of the UK we would recommend waiting until March after last frosts before pruning roses.

If you are deciding when to prune a ground cover rose for example, it is always prudent to wait until after it has finished flowering. Miniature roses or shrubs can be pruned during the summer months.

# Climbing & Rambling Roses Are Different

You can’t tar all rose varieties with the same bush though. Different types of rose will need to be pruned at different times of the year and in slightly different ways.

Climbers are happy with a late autumn and/or early winter pruning to keep them neat and tidy and flowering well. Whereas ramblers prefer pruning in late summer after their flowers have died out.

During autumn and winter there are less leaves on your climbing and rambling rose plants, making it easier to prune more accurately.

# How to Prune Roses

Make a cut up to 5mm above an existing bud with a clean pair of sharp gardening shears, any more than this and your plant might find it difficult to produce new growth from this stem. It is very important to angle your cut away from the plant as this prevents rain water from collecting and dripping towards it causing disease.

If you are looking for an open shape then concentrate your pruning on the outward facing rose buds. If you would prefer an upright growth shape then prune above the inward facing buds.

On an older, well established rose you can afford to use a bit of tough love. Cut out the woody stems that do not produce flowers. You can use a small saw for this if the stems are very thick.

# What if I Don’t Know What Type of Rose I Have?

If you are unable to identify the type of rose plant you are about to prune there are a few ways around your dilemma. Climbing or rambling roses tend to have long stems and you should aim to cut the older woody stems low down at the base of the rose plant.

The smaller rose bushes and shrubs have much more delicate stems and pruning should again be as low to ground level as possible. You can prune newer or greener stems and these bark covered shoots should be cut at the sides.

Either way, if you are in any doubt about when to prune roses, stick to February to March, the most common pruning time for roses.

Creating Upwards Garden Space

Outside space is valuable to everybody, except very regularly we don’t have enough, or what we do have is overwhelm by children toys, pets or utilized for stopping. So to recover a little corner back for yourself why not attempt ‘vertical cultivating’.

Indeed, even the most diminutive of spaces can be changed with somewhat vertical cultivating. The sky truly is the point of confinement, as you’ll be cultivating upwards and not at ground level. We’ve utilized an old stride stepping stool to spruce up a soiled corner yet you could undoubtedly utilize hanging bushel, a trellis or pots on dividers or fence posts.

# Ingredients

  • Enriched Compost
  • Miracle-Gro LiquaFeed (ideal for attaching to a hosepipe)
  • Patio Magic!
  • Empty pots or containers

# Other useful items

  • Garden string/wire
  • Gardening gloves
  • Trowel
  • Watering can or hose

# March to October: Pick a corner on your patio that could do with brightening up a bit, and think about ways in which you can start gardening upwards.

# If there’s any mould, moss or algae on the paving, clean it up with Patio Magic!. Applied through a watering can it shows effects in 3 to 4 days and goes on working for months.

# Next, place a layer of gravel or broken pots at the bottom of your chosen containers for drainage, then add some enriched compost, which is suitable for outdoor use. Place the root ball of your plant onto this layer and fill around with more compost.

# Plant up a selection of container type plants, including plenty of trailing ones such as ivy, fuchsia or geraniums. Experiment with different colour schemes, and try grouping different sizes together for a more relaxed feel.

# Place one of the pots on each of the steps of the ladder, or at different heights within your chosen area, with the trailing varieties towards the top.

Planting Sunflower

Sunflowers ordinarily develop in the Spring through to the Summer so it is best to plant in the Spring time. We would recommend planting in mid April all the way to the finish of May. This will create a developed plant that is liklely to flower during August.

Firstly, as with any planting, you should ensure that the dirt where you ar egrowing the sunflower is in the right condition to grow a sound plant. Obviously, on the off chance that you are utilizing a vegetable bed/pre made garden then you require not stress over this progression. On the off chance that anyway you are planting straight into the garden, you should clear the region being referred to of weeds and condition the dirt so it is fine and brittle. Remember that sunflowers require diect daylight for 6-8 hours a day, when picking the opportune place to plant your seeds.

Once the soil is in the right condition for planting it is time to drill holes for the sunflower seeds to be sown, we would recommend between 10-12mm deep. Sunflowers grow best when they are not crowded, so you must plant your seeds about 50cm apart, especially to cater for the low-growing varities which will branch out more. If you are planting very small varieties then you can plant the seeds a little closer together (around 40cm).

# Caring for Sunflowers

Sunflowers are a versatile plant which will thrive in many soil types, so you have a wide choice of soil and compost which will all get the job done. Of course, it will always be best to make sure the soil is as nutrient rich as possible. Once the seeds have been planted they may attract some garden pests and birds may try and eat the seeds. You can prevent this by either using a barrier, some wire or container to cover the seeds.We recommend using a cut bottle top as it is transparent so light can get to it, and there top allows for oxygen to circulate whilst being small enough to prevent intrusion.

Once your sunflowers start to grow to an established height the stem will sometimes need support. It is good practices to use some cane or bamboo alongside the stem with some string lightly tied to the plant to ensure it grows as tall as it can.

# What Can Sunflowers Be Used for?

You would be surprised by how many things that sunflowers are used for, more specifically the oil that is extracted from sunflowers. The obvious and most common use is sunflower oil which is very popular for cooking, but there are some which you may not have heard of too. For example sunflower oil can be used for fuel for automotive vehicles, as an ingredient in some types of glue and an ingredient in some types of soap.

As well as the oil, the seeds of sunflowers are very popular which can be eaten fresh.They are very popular for bird seeds, which you might want to keep in mind if you are looking to create a good environment for bird wildlife in your garden.

Aside from practical uses, sunflowers make a very attractive house ornament because of it’s large sun-like flower, which will brighten up any room and add something special to your home.

Feeding Border Plants, Here Its Tips

In people the distinction between adequate sustenance and insufficient is very obvious. The body goes through any vitality saves, getting thinner and turning out to be horrendously thin. Plants, much the same as people, need an adjusted eating routine of supplements to develop to their most extreme potential.

Plants should have the capacity to draw on stores of all the crucial components to have sound leaves and create quality blossoms and organic product. So if your petunias are pale and the leaves of your rhododendrons, tomatoes and roses are turning yellow between the veins then you have to get bolstering.

# General plant feeding

Plant starvation can be easily cured with a general plant food that contains all three major nutrients – nitrogen, phosphate and potash. One application of a controlled release plant food will feed your plants for several months, releasing nutrients depending on soil temperature. These smart plant foods increase the release of nutrients to match the requirements of the plant – more when its warm and less when the temperatures fall.

Alternatively you can feed and water every fortnight with soluble plant food applied quickly and easily through the feeder which feeds your plants as easy as watering. This is specially beneficial if you are growing lots of flowering bedding plants that need regular watering to thrive.

– Roses

For roses to produce a whole new set of stems, leaves and flowers every year, they use up plenty of plant foods and can soon exhaust reserves in the soil. Roses are heavy users of plant nutrients, so select a fertiliser that is rich in all nutrients. Rose & shrub plant foodis specially designed to feed roses and flowering shrubs. Sprinkle it around the plant roots twice a year, once in March just before new growth starts and again in May ready for summer flowering.

– Tomatoes

To produce a rewarding and tasty crop of tomatoes feed plants every 10 days with Levington Tomorite – Britain’s favourite liquid tomato food. It’s full of nutrients, supplemented with magnesium to help prevent leaves turning yellow between the veins.

# Acid-loving plants

Most Rhododendrons, Azaleas, Camellias and other acid loving plants can’t thrive in soil that contains too much lime. Unfortunately they cannot absorb natural iron from soils that are alkaline. This trace element may be there, but these ericaceous plants can’t use it. To avoid the problem either grow them in containers of an ericaceous compost or supply iron in a special plant food tonic.

One application of sequestrene plant tonic will supply enough chelated iron to last in the soil from early spring until plant growth slows in autumn. If your plants need regular feeding at the same time then use ericaceous compost every couple of weeks throughout the spring and summer.

# When to feed

Starting the growing season off with a good meal to avoid general malnutrition is good practice. Forward-looking gardeners dig well-rotted garden compost into the soil whenever appropriate and feed their plants with a balanced plant food from a box. Plant scientists make sure they include all the nutrients your different plants will need in the correct balance so you don’t have to even think about it. Just follow the instructions on each package.

Don’t feed plants growing outdoors when they are dormant. For most plants that means feeding during spring and summer and avoiding supplying extra nutrients during the winter when they are resting.

Flower Problems That You Should Know

# Aphids

The most common of all pests and almost every plant from the smallest shrub to the tallest oak tree can be infested.

# Rain Damage

Causes ‘balling’ of flower heads.

# Red spider mite

Perhaps the smallest of the common sap feeding insects. Leaves first develop a pale mottling but as the infestation progresses so the leaves become increasingly yellowish white.

# Earwigs

A pest that eats the developing buds of chrysanthemums and dahlias. These bugs cause damage to plants as they eat the young leaves and flowers. Damage is most easily recognised as irregular holes in leaves and petals.

# Grey mould

This is an extremely common fungus and grows on many plants. As the name suggests a greyish fuzzy fungal growth develops over the infected area.

# Smuts

Small dark spots on stems. Larger dark swellings again on stems often accompanied by leaf distortion. Sometimes swelling and distortion of a flower’s stamen. Black sooty powder.

# Thrips

Thrips (sometimes called Thunder Flies) are yellow-black, very thin and about 2mm long. Yet another sap feeding insect but one with a difference. This one will happily feed on the surface of a leaf.