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Monthly Archives: June 2016

Improve Border Soil Tips

Relatively few of us are normally honored with a decent rich topsoil soil that is perfect for developing all plants. Fortunately, on the off chance that you have a poor soil, it is sensibly simple to enhance it, so that about all plants will flourish.

# In Brief

The two soil extremes are overwhelming dirt and light, sandy soils – both can be enhanced by including heaps of cumbersome natural matter to enhance the structure and extend the scope of plants that will flourish.

Burrowing will enhance the seepage of dirt soils, however is pointless on topsoil or sandy soils. While you are burrowing, consolidate as much cumbersome natural matter as you are capable. Your fertilizer store will give all around spoiled material made from vegetable peelings from the kitchen blended with grass cuttings and other plant material, for example, fallen leaves, dead yearly sheet material plants and yearly weeds. On the other hand you can make leafmould from fallen tree and bush clears out.

If you don’t have enough material from your garden compost for your needs, then you will need to buy in suitable materials. These include well-rotted manure, mushroom compost, composted bark, all-purpose compost or tree and shrub planting compost and soil conditioners.

Also remember to dig in any compost from spent growing bags, patio pots and hanging baskets once they are finished.

# Improving Light Sandy Soils

Light sandy soils soon run short of nutrients and water quickly drains out of them, which means watering is required frequently during summer. Plants will only establish a shallow root system.

The way to improve this type of soil is to add bulky organic matter in spring. Use plenty of farmyard manure, garden compost or organic soil conditioner when planting to give moisture-holding material at root level. Mulch all over in late spring to reduce evaporation and use ground cover plants to shield the soil.

# Improving Heavy Clay Soil

Clay soils are usually cold, wet and sticky for most of the year, but in dry weather they dry out and can turn into ‘concrete’, surface cracks appear or the surface cakes over. On the positive side, clay soils are inately fertile and hold a lot of moisture and plant food, which are not leached away by rain. A good clay soil will grow all plants well – a rubbish soil, will only grow rubbish plants!

Dig any unplanted areas in early autumn, and add a generous amount of organic matter as you go. Leave the clods rough so that frost can break down the structure. A dressing of gypsum and even sharp sand or horticultural grit will also help in this process of producing a crumb structure. Repeat the process each autumn to help produce a crumbly textured soil.

Soil in between plants can be gradually improved if bulky organic matter is forked into the top 15cm (6in) of soil each autumn. A mulch layer of material applied each spring around established plants, will also help improve the structure and the amount of worm and micro-organism activity.

Know more about Pruning Roses

pruning-rosesKnowing when to prune roses is must be a standout amongst the most well-known cultivating pickles ever. To some less experienced planters it may appear to be irrelevant when you choose to make that cut, and in reality, where. Nonetheless, the minute you prune your roses can be the contrast between a solid dependable plant that delivers various buds and blooms, and one that won’t not last the winter.

This chomp measured guide will ideally go some approach to clarifying the significance of rose pruning, dissipating a few myths and help you to better deal with your rose plants.

# Why Do You Need to Prune Roses?

Before we go into when to prune roses and how to prune roses, we should first explain the reasons why it is important to prune roses at all. You might think roses and many plants in general can fend for themselves without much human intervention, and this is true on the whole. However, pruning and other small maintenance tasks can help plants to grow to their optimum and possibly last longer than they would if just left to their own devices.

The act of cutting a rose branch helps the plant to produce a hormone called auxin. This growth hormone is present in the main stem of most plants and pruning sends it to the freshly cut stem and encourages it to produce new shoots.

Pruning roses also helps to control the size and shape of your rose plant while ensuring it’s health and flowering capabilities.

# When to Prune Roses

The majority of roses are pruned between late winter, during February and early March, but this normally depends on your climate and where you are in the UK.

In the south you are safest to prune roses in late February just as the new growth begins on rose plants. If you live in the north and other colder areas of the UK we would recommend waiting until March after last frosts before pruning roses.

If you are deciding when to prune a ground cover rose for example, it is always prudent to wait until after it has finished flowering. Miniature roses or shrubs can be pruned during the summer months.

# Climbing & Rambling Roses Are Different

You can’t tar all rose varieties with the same bush though. Different types of rose will need to be pruned at different times of the year and in slightly different ways.

Climbers are happy with a late autumn and/or early winter pruning to keep them neat and tidy and flowering well. Whereas ramblers prefer pruning in late summer after their flowers have died out.

During autumn and winter there are less leaves on your climbing and rambling rose plants, making it easier to prune more accurately.

# How to Prune Roses

Make a cut up to 5mm above an existing bud with a clean pair of sharp gardening shears, any more than this and your plant might find it difficult to produce new growth from this stem. It is very important to angle your cut away from the plant as this prevents rain water from collecting and dripping towards it causing disease.

If you are looking for an open shape then concentrate your pruning on the outward facing rose buds. If you would prefer an upright growth shape then prune above the inward facing buds.

On an older, well established rose you can afford to use a bit of tough love. Cut out the woody stems that do not produce flowers. You can use a small saw for this if the stems are very thick.

# What if I Don’t Know What Type of Rose I Have?

If you are unable to identify the type of rose plant you are about to prune there are a few ways around your dilemma. Climbing or rambling roses tend to have long stems and you should aim to cut the older woody stems low down at the base of the rose plant.

The smaller rose bushes and shrubs have much more delicate stems and pruning should again be as low to ground level as possible. You can prune newer or greener stems and these bark covered shoots should be cut at the sides.

Either way, if you are in any doubt about when to prune roses, stick to February to March, the most common pruning time for roses.

Creating Upwards Garden Space

Outside space is valuable to everybody, except very regularly we don’t have enough, or what we do have is overwhelm by children toys, pets or utilized for stopping. So to recover a little corner back for yourself why not attempt ‘vertical cultivating’.

Indeed, even the most diminutive of spaces can be changed with somewhat vertical cultivating. The sky truly is the point of confinement, as you’ll be cultivating upwards and not at ground level. We’ve utilized an old stride stepping stool to spruce up a soiled corner yet you could undoubtedly utilize hanging bushel, a trellis or pots on dividers or fence posts.

# Ingredients

  • Enriched Compost
  • Miracle-Gro LiquaFeed (ideal for attaching to a hosepipe)
  • Patio Magic!
  • Empty pots or containers

# Other useful items

  • Garden string/wire
  • Gardening gloves
  • Trowel
  • Watering can or hose

# March to October: Pick a corner on your patio that could do with brightening up a bit, and think about ways in which you can start gardening upwards.

# If there’s any mould, moss or algae on the paving, clean it up with Patio Magic!. Applied through a watering can it shows effects in 3 to 4 days and goes on working for months.

# Next, place a layer of gravel or broken pots at the bottom of your chosen containers for drainage, then add some enriched compost, which is suitable for outdoor use. Place the root ball of your plant onto this layer and fill around with more compost.

# Plant up a selection of container type plants, including plenty of trailing ones such as ivy, fuchsia or geraniums. Experiment with different colour schemes, and try grouping different sizes together for a more relaxed feel.

# Place one of the pots on each of the steps of the ladder, or at different heights within your chosen area, with the trailing varieties towards the top.