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Monthly Archives: May 2016

Planting Sunflower

Sunflowers ordinarily develop in the Spring through to the Summer so it is best to plant in the Spring time. We would recommend planting in mid April all the way to the finish of May. This will create a developed plant that is liklely to flower during August.

Firstly, as with any planting, you should ensure that the dirt where you ar egrowing the sunflower is in the right condition to grow a sound plant. Obviously, on the off chance that you are utilizing a vegetable bed/pre made garden then you require not stress over this progression. On the off chance that anyway you are planting straight into the garden, you should clear the region being referred to of weeds and condition the dirt so it is fine and brittle. Remember that sunflowers require diect daylight for 6-8 hours a day, when picking the opportune place to plant your seeds.

Once the soil is in the right condition for planting it is time to drill holes for the sunflower seeds to be sown, we would recommend between 10-12mm deep. Sunflowers grow best when they are not crowded, so you must plant your seeds about 50cm apart, especially to cater for the low-growing varities which will branch out more. If you are planting very small varieties then you can plant the seeds a little closer together (around 40cm).

# Caring for Sunflowers

Sunflowers are a versatile plant which will thrive in many soil types, so you have a wide choice of soil and compost which will all get the job done. Of course, it will always be best to make sure the soil is as nutrient rich as possible. Once the seeds have been planted they may attract some garden pests and birds may try and eat the seeds. You can prevent this by either using a barrier, some wire or container to cover the seeds.We recommend using a cut bottle top as it is transparent so light can get to it, and there top allows for oxygen to circulate whilst being small enough to prevent intrusion.

Once your sunflowers start to grow to an established height the stem will sometimes need support. It is good practices to use some cane or bamboo alongside the stem with some string lightly tied to the plant to ensure it grows as tall as it can.

# What Can Sunflowers Be Used for?

You would be surprised by how many things that sunflowers are used for, more specifically the oil that is extracted from sunflowers. The obvious and most common use is sunflower oil which is very popular for cooking, but there are some which you may not have heard of too. For example sunflower oil can be used for fuel for automotive vehicles, as an ingredient in some types of glue and an ingredient in some types of soap.

As well as the oil, the seeds of sunflowers are very popular which can be eaten fresh.They are very popular for bird seeds, which you might want to keep in mind if you are looking to create a good environment for bird wildlife in your garden.

Aside from practical uses, sunflowers make a very attractive house ornament because of it’s large sun-like flower, which will brighten up any room and add something special to your home.

Feeding Border Plants, Here Its Tips

In people the distinction between adequate sustenance and insufficient is very obvious. The body goes through any vitality saves, getting thinner and turning out to be horrendously thin. Plants, much the same as people, need an adjusted eating routine of supplements to develop to their most extreme potential.

Plants should have the capacity to draw on stores of all the crucial components to have sound leaves and create quality blossoms and organic product. So if your petunias are pale and the leaves of your rhododendrons, tomatoes and roses are turning yellow between the veins then you have to get bolstering.

# General plant feeding

Plant starvation can be easily cured with a general plant food that contains all three major nutrients – nitrogen, phosphate and potash. One application of a controlled release plant food will feed your plants for several months, releasing nutrients depending on soil temperature. These smart plant foods increase the release of nutrients to match the requirements of the plant – more when its warm and less when the temperatures fall.

Alternatively you can feed and water every fortnight with soluble plant food applied quickly and easily through the feeder which feeds your plants as easy as watering. This is specially beneficial if you are growing lots of flowering bedding plants that need regular watering to thrive.

– Roses

For roses to produce a whole new set of stems, leaves and flowers every year, they use up plenty of plant foods and can soon exhaust reserves in the soil. Roses are heavy users of plant nutrients, so select a fertiliser that is rich in all nutrients. Rose & shrub plant foodis specially designed to feed roses and flowering shrubs. Sprinkle it around the plant roots twice a year, once in March just before new growth starts and again in May ready for summer flowering.

– Tomatoes

To produce a rewarding and tasty crop of tomatoes feed plants every 10 days with Levington Tomorite – Britain’s favourite liquid tomato food. It’s full of nutrients, supplemented with magnesium to help prevent leaves turning yellow between the veins.

# Acid-loving plants

Most Rhododendrons, Azaleas, Camellias and other acid loving plants can’t thrive in soil that contains too much lime. Unfortunately they cannot absorb natural iron from soils that are alkaline. This trace element may be there, but these ericaceous plants can’t use it. To avoid the problem either grow them in containers of an ericaceous compost or supply iron in a special plant food tonic.

One application of sequestrene plant tonic will supply enough chelated iron to last in the soil from early spring until plant growth slows in autumn. If your plants need regular feeding at the same time then use ericaceous compost every couple of weeks throughout the spring and summer.

# When to feed

Starting the growing season off with a good meal to avoid general malnutrition is good practice. Forward-looking gardeners dig well-rotted garden compost into the soil whenever appropriate and feed their plants with a balanced plant food from a box. Plant scientists make sure they include all the nutrients your different plants will need in the correct balance so you don’t have to even think about it. Just follow the instructions on each package.

Don’t feed plants growing outdoors when they are dormant. For most plants that means feeding during spring and summer and avoiding supplying extra nutrients during the winter when they are resting.

Flower Problems That You Should Know

# Aphids

The most common of all pests and almost every plant from the smallest shrub to the tallest oak tree can be infested.

# Rain Damage

Causes ‘balling’ of flower heads.

# Red spider mite

Perhaps the smallest of the common sap feeding insects. Leaves first develop a pale mottling but as the infestation progresses so the leaves become increasingly yellowish white.

# Earwigs

A pest that eats the developing buds of chrysanthemums and dahlias. These bugs cause damage to plants as they eat the young leaves and flowers. Damage is most easily recognised as irregular holes in leaves and petals.

# Grey mould

This is an extremely common fungus and grows on many plants. As the name suggests a greyish fuzzy fungal growth develops over the infected area.

# Smuts

Small dark spots on stems. Larger dark swellings again on stems often accompanied by leaf distortion. Sometimes swelling and distortion of a flower’s stamen. Black sooty powder.

# Thrips

Thrips (sometimes called Thunder Flies) are yellow-black, very thin and about 2mm long. Yet another sap feeding insect but one with a difference. This one will happily feed on the surface of a leaf.